‘We Were Liars’, E. Lockhart

‘We Were Liars’, E. Lockhart

I read many things this summer, including both Anna Karenina and Captain Corelli’s Mandolin. I was looking forward to reading books that were of literary ‘worth’ for my own pleasure, outside of the confines of university. However, the book that stood out for me wasn’t a classic novel or a profound political masterpiece, it was We Were Liars, a YA fiction novel by E. Lockhart.

Continue reading “‘We Were Liars’, E. Lockhart”

A Hidden Gem: The Barber Institute of Fine Arts

A Hidden Gem: The Barber Institute of Fine Arts

Like many other students, I walk past the Barber Institute every day without thinking about it. However, it’s far more than just another building; a piece in the landscape between me and my lectures. The building is a beautiful example of art-deco architecture, which was designed by Robert Atkinson in the 1930s, and is classed as Grade II listed. However, its inside, in the galleries, exhibitions and concert hall, that the Barber Institute really reveals itself to be a cultural gem. Continue reading “A Hidden Gem: The Barber Institute of Fine Arts”

‘Dorian Gray’ at the Old Joint Stock Theatre

‘Dorian Gray’ at the Old Joint Stock Theatre

Dorian Gray is an exciting new theatre adaption of Oscar Wilde’s classic decadent and aesthetic novel The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890). The play was set in the Golden Age of Hollywood Cinema; an appropriate setting which enables discussion of ‘making pictures’, drives the egotism of the title rolled character, and gives the characters a very real sense of literally ‘acting’ their double lives. Dorian is a fabulous if narcissistic movie-star, Harry becomes a blasé studio executive, and Basil is a passionate director, who makes a picture starring Dorian rather than painting his portrait. The performance was certainly short, lasting less than an hour, but the intensity of the emotions the actors portrayed as they struggled to influence Dorian, and he struggled to control himself, made this character study an interesting, immersive and emotional roller-coaster for the audience. Continue reading “‘Dorian Gray’ at the Old Joint Stock Theatre”

‘Save the Last Dance for Me’ at the New Alexandra Theatre

‘Save the Last Dance for Me’ at the New Alexandra Theatre

 

Save the Last Dance for Me is the story of two sisters, Jennifer (Lola Saunders) and Marie (Elizabeth Carter), who go on holiday together to the seaside in Lowestoft in the summer of 1963.

There they visit the local army base, where innocent 17 year-old Marie meets the love of her life, American airman Curtis (Jason Denton). After a few minor problems, such as the colour of Curtis’ skin and the fact Marie is still in school, the couple are finally united at the end of the show. Jennifer also finds love along the way, falling for the ice-cream man Carlo (Alan Howell), whose Wolverhampton-Italian accent had the audience laughing and cringing in equal measure. Laughs were also provided by ‘punny’ dialogue, which played on the difference between American and English slang, as well as supplying a few moments of cheeky innuendo. Continue reading “‘Save the Last Dance for Me’ at the New Alexandra Theatre”